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1984
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1984 NHL DRAFT PICK
Patrick Roy
Selected in third round
No. 51 overall by Montreal Canadiens

Born October 5, 1965
Position: Goaltender
Height: 6-0   Weight: 165
BEFORE THE DRAFT
Last Team: Granby (QMJHL)                             
Birthplace: Quebec City, Quebec (Canada)
Hometown: Cap-Rouge, Quebec
PRE-DRAFT STATISTICS
Year TeamLeague GPW-L-T GAASO SV%
1981-82 St. FoyQue. AAA 4027-3-10 2.630 n/a
1982-83 GranbyQMJHL 5413-35-1 6.260 n/a
1983-84 GranbyQMJHL 6129-29-1 4.440 n/a

PRE-DRAFT AWARDS AND HONORS
QMJHL All-Star Third Team:
1982-83 (Granby)
Miscellaneous: Grew up in Quebec City, where his father, Michel, worked as vice-president of the Quebec Automobile Insurance Board. ... Grew up rooting for Nordiques and idolizing former Quebec goalie Dan Bouchard. When Roy was a boy, Bouchard gave him one of his sticks, which Roy was known to sleep with. ... Served as part-time DJ on Quebec-based music video channel during his junior career.
NHL CAREER
Debut: March 23, 1985 (Winnipeg at Montreal)
Numbers:  33 (Montreal); 33 (Colorado) (number retired)
Stanley Cup: 1986, 1993, 1996, 2001
Playing Status:
Retired May 28, 2003
CAREER NHL STATISTICS
YearsTeams GP W-L-TGAA SOSV%
1985-2003 Montreal, Colo.1,029 551-315-1312.54 66.910
CAREER NHL PLAYOFF STATISTICS
YearsTeams GPW-L GAA SOSV%
1986-2003 Montreal, Colo.247 151-942.3023 .918

NHL AWARDS AND HONORS
Vezina Trophy:
1988-89, 1989-90, 1991-92 (Montreal)
Conn Smythe Trophy: 1986, 1993 (Montreal), 2001 (Colorado)
Jennings Trophy: 1986-87, 1987-88, 1988-89 (Montreal) (co-winner with Brian Hayward), 1991-92 (Montreal), 2001-02 (Colorado)
Trico Goaltender Award (Save Percentage Leader): 1988-89 (Montreal) (.908), 1989-90 (Montreal) (.912)
NHL All-Star First Team: 1988-89, 1989-90, 1991-92 (Montreal), 2001-02 (Colorado)
Sporting News All-Star First Team: 1988-89, 1989-90, 1991-92 (Montreal), 2001-02 (Colorado)
NHL All-Star Second Team: 1987-88, 1990-91 (Montreal)
Sporting News All-Star Second Team: 1990-91 (Montreal)
NHL All-Rookie Team: 1985-86 (Montreal)
All-Star Game: 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994 (Montreal),
1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003 (Colorado)
Stanley Cup Finals (Lost): 1989 (Montreal)
Montreal Molson Cup (Three-Stars Leader): 1988-89, 1991-92, 1993-94, 1995
NHL Records: Most career games played by a goaltender (1,029), most career playoff games by any NHL player (247), most career wins (551), most career minutes played by a goaltender (60,235), most career 30-win seasons (13), most career playoff games played by a goaltender (247), most career playoff wins (151), most career playoff minutes by a goalie (15,209), most career playoff shutouts (23), most career wins, combined regular-season and playoffs (702), most victories by a goalie in one playoff year (16 for Montreal in 1993, for Colorado in 1996, and for Colorado in 2001, shares record), most consecutive victories by a goalie in one playoff year (11 for Montreal from April 22, 1993, to May 20, 1993, shares record), most consecutive regular-season games without a loss on home ice (35 games from Feb. 24, 1988, until Oct. 16, 1989), youngest player ever to win Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP (20 years, 8 months), most playoff years with 10 or more wins (9)
Montreal Records: Most career games played combined regular-season and playoffs (665), most career minutes played combined regular-season and playoffs by a goaltender (38,882), most career playoff games (114), most career playoff minutes (6,964), most games played by a goaltender in one playoff year (20 in 1986 and 1993, shares record), most games played, including playoffs, in one season (82 in 1992-93), most minutes played by a goalie in one playoff year (1,293 in 1993), most victories by a goalie in one playoff year (16 in 1993), most consecutive playoff wins (11 from April 22, 1993, to May 20, 1993, shares record), most consecutive wins by a goalie in one playoff year (11 from April 22, 1993, to May 20, 1993), most saves by a goalie in one playoff game (60 in Game 5 of first-round series at Boston on April 25, 1994, a 2-1 Montreal win in overtime), most shots faced by a goalie in one playoff game (61 in Game 5 of first-round series at Boston on April 25, 1994, a 2-1 Montreal win in overtime), most consecutive playoff wins at home (8 from April 19, 1986, to May 22, 1986, and from April 22, 1993, to May 24, 1993), most consecutive playoff wins on road (5 from April 9, 1989, to May 11, 1989), most consecutive losses in one playoff year (4 from April 10, 1988, to April 26, 1988, shares record), most consecutive losses on road in one playoff year (5 from April 23, 1992, to May 9, 1992), fewest losses in one season by a goalie with more than 35 games (5 in 1988-89, shares record), most consecutive home victories (14 from Dec. 12, 1988, to March 22, 1989), most consecutive games in one regular season without a loss on home ice (29 from Oct. 8, 1988, to April 1, 1989), most consecutive decisions in one regulars season without a loss on home ice (28 from Oct. 19. 1988, to April 1, 1989)
Colorado Records: Most career games played by a goalie (478), most career minutes played by a goalie (28,320), most career shutouts (37), lowest career goals-against average (2.27), most career wins (262), most career ties (65) most games played by a goalie in one season (65 in 1997-98), most minutes played by a goalie in one season (3,835 in 1997-98), most wins by a goalie in one season (40 in 2000-01), lowest goals-against average in one season (1.94 in 2001-02), most shutouts in one season (9 in 2001-02), most ties in one season (13 in 1997-98 and 2002-03), most career losses (140), most career goals allowed (1,070), most career playoff shutouts (18), most shutouts in one playoff year (4 in 2001), most shutouts in one playoff series (2 vs. Chicago in 1997, vs. Dallas in 2000, vs. Los Angeles in 2001, vs. New Jersey in 2001, and vs. San Jose in 2002), most saves in one playoff year (598), most saves in one playoff series (219 vs. Detroit in 1999), most saves in one playoff game (63 in Game 4 of Stanley Cup Finals series at Florida on June 10, 1996 -- a 1-0 victory in overtime), most saves in one period of one playoff game (21 in Game 2 of second-round series vs. Edmonton on May 4, 1997)
NHL Goalie Games-Played Leader: 1995 (Montreal) (43, tie)
NHL Goals-Against Average Leader: 1988-89 (Montreal) (2.47), 1991-92 (Montreal) (2.36), 2001-02 (Colorado) (1.94)
NHL Save Percentage Leader: 1987-88 (Montreal) (.900), 1988-89 (Montreal) (.908), 1989-90 (Montreal) (.912), 1991-92 (Montreal) (.914)
NHL Wins Leader: 1989-90 (Montreal) (31), 1996-97 (Colorado) (38)
NHL Shutouts Leader: 1991-92 (Montreal) (5), 1993-94 (Montreal) (7), 2001-02 (Colorado) (9)
NHL Playoffs Goals-Against Average Leader: 1989 (Montreal) (2.09), 1993 (Montreal) (2.13), 2001 (Colorado) (1.70)
NHL Playoffs Goalie Games Played Leader: 1996 (Colorado) (22)
NHL Playoffs Minutes Leader: 1996 (Colorado) (1,454 minutes)
NHL Playoffs Wins Leader: 1986 (Montreal) (15), 1993 (Montreal) (16), 1996 (Colorado) (16), 2001 (Colorado) (16)
NHL Playoffs Shutouts Leader: 1986 (Montreal) (1, tie), 1996 (Colorado) (3), 1997 (Colorado) (3, tie), 2001 (Colorado) (4)
NHL Playoffs Save Percentage Leader: 1997 (Colorado) (.932)
Miscellaneous: Ranked by The Hockey News in 1997 as the 35th greatest NHL player of all time. ... Ranked as the No. 1 goaltender of all time in the book Without Fear by Kevin Allen and Bob Duff. ... Was told he would wear No. 32 at Montreal's 1984 training camp even though he had requested No. 33. He was then given the No. 33 when Richard Sevigny opted to sign with Quebec in July 1984. ...Called up to the NHL for the first time on an emergency basis in February 1985 after Montreal goaltender Steve Penney was hit in groin by a Guy Carbonneau slap shot during a Canadiens practice. Roy made his NHL debut in the Canadiens' next game, when he started the third period of a 4-4 tie in relief of Doug Soetaert and made two saves to register his first NHL win in his first NHL appearance. Roy remained with the Habs, backing up Soetaert until Penney returned for Montreal's March 6, 1985, game at Winnipeg... Made his first NHL start in Montreal's 1985-86 season opener at Pittsburgh, making 23 saves for a 5-3 Canadiens victory. ... Lost on home ice for first time in more than a year, when he gave up OT goal to Dale Hunter in Montreal's 4-3 loss to Washington on Oct. 16, 1989. The loss ended his NHL-record 35-game home unbeaten streak. ... Fined by Montreal for missing practice on Oct. 18, 1989. He said he had overslept because his young son, Jonathan, had knocked the telephone off the hook, causing him to miss his wake-up call. ... Named NHL Player of Week for week ending Feb. 4, 1990. ... Named NHL Player of Week for week ending March 18, 1990. ... Missed part of 1990-91 season with first-degree sprain of MCL in left knee, an injury suffered when teammate Petr Svoboda fell on top of Roy's leg at 17:12 of the second period during Montreal's Dec. 12, 1990, game at Toronto. Svoboda had been checked by Wendel Clark and lost his balance at the time he fell onto Roy. As a result of his first major NHL injury, Roy did not return to action until Montreal's Jan. 5, 1991, game vs. Quebec. He made 18 saves in that game for a 3-0 shutout. ... Missed part of 1990-91 season with torn ligaments in left ankle, an injury suffered when he got caught against the end boards in the middle of a collision with Graeme Townshend and teammate Donald Dufresne at 3:16 of the second period during Montreal's Jan. 27, 1991, game vs. Boston. Townshend and Dufresne sandwiched Roy's legs as he was coming out to play the puck, and then Roy twisted the ankle when he fell backwards on to the ice. Roy was taken off on a stretcher and wound up in a cast. He did not return to action until Montreal's March 4, 1991, game at Calgary. He made 36 saves in that game but lost on an overtime goal by Ric Nattress. ... Missed part of 1991-92 season with re-aggravation of left ankle injury, suffered during second period of Montreal's March 16, 1991, game vs. Buffalo. He left the game as a precaution and did not return to action until Montreal's March 23, 1991, game vs. New Jersey. ... Was runner-up to Mark Messier for 1991-92 Hart Trophy. ... Missed part of 1992-93 season with strained hip flexor, an injury suffered at 15:07 of the first period during Montreal's March 6, 1993, game at Minnesota. He did not return to action until Montreal's March 13, 1993, game vs. Quebec. ... Missed part of 1993-94 season with sore neck, an injury suffered during Montreal's Dec. 11, 1993, game vs. Washington. He did not return to action until Montreal's Dec. 18, 1993, game vs. Detroit. ... Missed part of 1993-94 season with strained neck, an injury suffered at 9:42 of the first period during Montreal's Dec. 22, 1993, game vs. N.Y. Islanders. He did not return to action until Montreal's Jan. 2, 1994, game at Vancouver. He made 28 saves in that game for a 3-2 victory. ... Missed part of 1994 playoffs with appendicitis. ... Recorded his 300th career NHL win for Colorado on Feb. 19, 1996, vs. Edmonton. ... Recorded his 30th career NHL shutout for Colorado on March 3, 1996, vs. Toronto. ... Passed Billy Smith to become all-time NHL leader in playoff games played by a goaltender when he appeared in his 133rd career NHL playoff game for Colorado in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Finals vs. Florida on June 4, 1996. ... Named NHL Player of Week for week ending Jan. 12, 1997. ... Missed part of 1996-97 season with sprained right thumb, an injury suffered at 13:54 of the first period during Colorado's Jan. 23, 1997, game at Pittsburgh. He did not return to action until Colorado's Jan. 29, 1997, game vs. Los Angeles. He made 29 saves in that game to give Colorado a 6-3 win. ... Missed part of 1996-97 season with sprained left shoulder, an injury suffered during when he was tackled by Brendan Shanahan on his way to fighting Mike Vernon during Colorado's March 26, 1997, game at Detroit. He did not return to action until Colorado's April 6, 1997, game vs. Phoenix. ... Set Colorado single-season records (since broken) for wins (38) and shutouts (7) in 1996-97. ... Finished second in NHL with seven shutouts and third in NHL with .923 save percentage in 1996-97. ... Was finalist for 1996-97 Vezina Trophy. ... Set Colorado single-season records (since broken) for games played by a goaltender (62), minutes played by a goaltender (3,698) and shutouts (7) in 1996-97. The previous franchise records for games played in one season (60) and minutes played in one season (3,572) had been held by Roy's idol, Dan Bouchard. ... Passed Billy Smith to become the all-time winningest NHL playoff goalie by beating Chicago 7-0 in Game 5 of Colorado's first-round series vs. Blackhawks on April 24, 1997. It was his 89th career playoff win. ... Named NHL Player of Week for week ending Oct. 5, 1997. ... Missed part of 1997-98 season with partially dislocated left shoulder, an injury suffered at 14:57 of the first period during Colorado's Nov. 18, 1997, game at Washington. He did not return to action until Colorado's Nov. 26, 1997, game at Tampa Bay. ... Missed part of 1998-99 season with left knee injury, suffered during Colorado's Dec. 26, 1998, game vs. Dallas. While out with the injury, he began experiencing back spasms on Jan. 4, 1999. As a result, he did not return to action until Colorado's Jan. 12, 1999, game vs. Chicago. ... Named NHL Player of Month for January 1999. ... Became youngest goalie in NHL history to reach 400 career wins when he achieved feat in Colorado's Feb. 5, 1999, game at Detroit. At age 33 years and 4 months, he was only the fifth NHL goalie to reach 400 wins and accomplished it in the fewest games (753). ... Missed part of 1998-99 season with groin injury, suffered during Colorado's Feb. 21, 1999, game at Dallas. He did not return to action until Colorado's Feb. 27, 1999, game vs. Nashville. ... Named NHL Player of Week for week ending March 21, 1999. ... Missed part of 1999-00 season with neck injury, suffered during Colorado's Feb. 15, 2000, game at Washington. ... Missed part of 1999-00 season with groin injury, suffered during Colorado's Feb. 18, 2000, game vs. N.Y. Rangers. He did not return to action until Colorado's Feb. 25, 2000, game at St. Louis. ... Passed Terry Sawchuk to become the NHL's all-time regular-season wins leader with a 4-3 overtime victory in Colorado's Oct. 17, 2000, game at Washington. The game, won on an OT goal by Peter Forsberg, was Roy's 448th career victory. ... Missed part of 2000-01 season with tendinitis in knee, an injury suffered during Colorado's March 20, 2001, game vs. San Jose. ... Set Colorado single-season record (since broken) for lowest goals-against average with 2.21 in 2000-01. ... Had two shutouts for Colorado in 2001 Stanley Cup Finals vs. New Jersey, becoming first goalie to achieve that feat in the finals since 1965. ... Had a shutout streak of 227:41 in Stanley Cup Finals games played over the 1996 and 2001 finals series. ... Became first player in NHL history to win the the Conn Smythe Trophy three times when he achieved that feat in 2001. ... Missed part of 2001-02 season with hip injury, suffered during Colorado's Oct. 21, 2001, game at Chicago. He did not return to action until Colorado's Oct. 27, 2001, game at Phoenix. ... Named NHL Player of Week for week ending Nov. 18, 2001. ... Became first NHL goaltender to win 200 games for two different teams when he achieved feat with his 200th Colorado win on Nov. 14, 2001, vs. Minnesota. ... Finalist for Hart Trophy and Vezina Trophy in 2001-02. ... Played in 972nd career NHL game for Colorado on Oct. 24, 2002, at Phoenix to pass Terry Sawchuk for No. 1 on the all-time list of games played by a goaltender. ... Played in his 1,000th career NHL game for Colorado vs. Dallas on Jan. 20, 2003, becoming the first NHL goalie to play in 1,000 games. ... Named NHL Player of the Week for the week ending Jan. 26, 2003. ... Named NHL Player of the Week for the week ending Feb. 9, 2003. ... Colorado retired Roy's No. 33 prior to a game vs. Calgary on Oct. 28, 2003. Prior to the ceremony, all of Colorado's players wore the No. 33 during warm-ups.
Bursting into Stardom: Although it took him a full season before he reached the NHL as a regular, Roy did not waste time establishing himself once he got there. As one of eight rookies who started the 1985-86 season with Montreal, Roy went on to a stellar first season that earned him a spot on the NHL All-Rookie team. But it was in the 1986 playoffs where he really made his mark as one of the game's greats. Roy led the Canadiens to playoff series victories over Boston, Hartford and the New York Rangers, setting up a showdown with Calgary in the Stanley Cup Finals. It took the Habs just five games to dispense with the Flames and win their 23rd Stanley Cup. With that victory, Montreal became the North American pro sports franchise with the most league titles, passing the New York Yankees. Roy saved the day in Game 5 with a dramatic kick save on Jamie Macoun with just 14 seconds left in the third period, preserving a 43 win for Montreal on May 24, 1986. Two nights earlier, he had shut out the Flames with 15 saves in a 1-0 win. His heroics down the stretch helped Roy win the first of his three Conn Smythe Trophies as the NHL postseason MVP. In the process, he became the first and only player since Ken Dryden to win the Conn Smythe Trophy and Stanley Cup as a rookie.
Roy's Big Suspension: Roy was suspended by the NHL for eight games during the 1987-88 season for slashing Warren Babe during Montreal's Oct. 19, 1987, game vs. Minnesota. Roy, who had been annoyed with Babe during the game, came out of the crease and hit Babe with a two-handed slash on the left knee with less than two minutes remaining in the Canadiens' 5-1 victory. The slash injured Babe badly enough that he could not skate back to the bench on his own and was out for the next 10 days with a bruised knee. Minnesota coach Herb Brooks vowed that "Next time, Roy will get his throat slashed," referring to a Nov. 27 scheduled game at Minnesota. Brooks backed off those comments but joined Lou Nanne in asking the league to suspend Roy for the same eight-game sentence that Philadelphia's Ron Hextall had been given for slashing Edmonton's Kent Nilsson during the 1987 Stanley Cup Finals. Brooks said the Roy slash was no less violent and threatened the league's integrity. Roy, who received a major penalty for the slash, apologized for his action, but said that Babe had crosschecked him twice during the game. He also said his slash was not on par with the "Hextall thing." It was hard to verify this, since it happened while Minnesota's Richard Zemlack and Montreal's John Kordic were in the middle of a fight that drew the attention of referee Rob Shick, linesman Kevin Collins and Mike Cvik, and the TV crew televising the game. Only Lance Roberts, a stand-by referee who happened to be at the game, saw the incident and was able to report it to the NHL, which set up a hearing for Oct. 29, 1987. Roy continued to play for the Canadiens up until and after the hearing, with his last start coming vs. Edmonton on Oct. 28, 1987. But following the hearing, the league ruled that Roy would be suspended. The eight games shocked the Canadiens, who did not think Roy would get a punishment equal to Hextall's. As a result of the suspension, Roy did not return to action until Montreal's Nov. 14, 1987, game vs. Chicago. He shut out the Blackhawks 3-0 in that game.
Meltdown in Montreal: Despite being one of the most popular players in Montreal Canadiens history, Roy's stay with the team came to an abrupt and unpleasant end in early December 1995. Trouble had been brewing for some time, as Roy had shown a clear dislike for coach Mario Tremblay, a former teammate from Roy's rookie year who had taken over behind the bench on Oct. 21, 1995. Roy's dislike of Tremblay grew during the first several weeks of their working together, when the were involved in several arguments at practice. Roy was also upset that Tremblay had often criticized him during his years as a sports-talk radio host prior to taking the job as Montreal's head coach. Regardless of the feud's roots, for years afterward, Tremblay would be remembered by Habs fans as the man who drove Roy out of Montreal. That deep and growing animosity between Tremblay and Roy came to a head on Dec. 2, 1995, during Montreal's 11-1 home loss to Detroit, Tremblay wouldn't allow Roy to come out of the game, instead forcing him to give up nine goals on 26 shots before finally removing him at 11:57 of the second period. Roy, who had been given more freedom to remove himself from routs under Montreal's previous coaches, became enraged and refused to speak to Tremblay. With the game still in progress, Roy told Montreal president Ronald Corey he would never play for the team again. He then told Tremblay the coach had just cost Montreal its starting goaltender. Roy later told the Montreal press Tremblay had "humiliated" him by leaving him in net after he gave up five first-period goals on 17 shots and was taking abuse from Montreal fans. He said he wouldn't have asked to be traded if Tremblay had not forced him to go back out for the second period, and he was especially angry that Tremblay had left him in the game after the seventh goal. Four days later, Roy was traded to Colorado.
Arrested in Colorado: In October 2000, during the first week after he had become the NHL's all-time wins leader, Roy was involved in a bizarre incident that led to allegations of spousal abuse. In the early morning hours of Oct. 22, 2000, just days after he got the historic victory to pass Terry Sawchuk, Roy was arrested at his new $1.4 million home in Greenwood Village, Colo., as police investigated the possibility that he had been physically abusing his wife, Michele. A police report stated the Roys had been arguing over their in-laws when Michele Roy became frightened enough of her husband's anger to call 911 at 2:33 a.m. Apprarently, an infuriated Patrick Roy had ripped two doors off the hinges to the bedroom. However, when she called 911, Michele Roy did not say anything to the 911 operator and immediately hung up. Police tracked the call to the Roy house and arrested Patrick Roy, because state law required arrests in all suspected domestic violence cases if there was any sign of property damage. Roy did not enter a plea when arraigned in court and was released on a $750 cash bond. Meanwhile, Michele Roy refused to cooperate with the police investigators, wanting no part of anything that might land her husband in jail. This made it all but impossible for Arapahoe County prosecutors to charge Roy with anything, although Judge Richard Jauch issued a restraining order against Roy that prevented him from retaliating against his wife in any way or to possess weapons or drink alcohol until the case had been resolved. The following day, Roy returned to Colorado's practice and said he could not comment on the case, while also asking the media to "respect our privacy at this time." Roy was ordered to return to court on Nov. 7, 2000, for a pretrial conference to determine if there was enough evidence for charges to be filed. If convicted of criminal mischief related to the damaged bedroom doors, Roy would have faced at least one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. Roy hired defense attorney Pamela Mackey, who would later go on to successfully defend NBA superstar Kobe Bryant against rape allegations. Mackey not only made sure no domestic violence charges were filed, but she also filed a motion to have the original criminal mischief charge dismissed. Mackey successfully argued that the criminal mischief statute applied only to a person who knowingly damaged property that belonged to someone else. Since Roy was the owner of the damaged property, and his wife had subsequently said she was in another room when the doors were ripped off their hinges, it was deemed that no crime had actually been committed in the Roy household. In January 2001, the case was summarily dismissed.
Revolutionary Goaltender: Often referred to as the greatest goalie of all time, Roy is undoubtedly one of the most influential. His unique style and penchant for wearing the largest padding possible literally changed the game and influenced an entire generation of Quebec-born goaltenders. Just as Wayne Gretzky had inspired young Canadian players to rethink what was possible in their careers, Roy inspired young French-Canadian goaltenders. As if to signal a passing of the torch, in the same year that Roy retired, Jean-Sebastien Giguere of Anaheim won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. It was hardly a surprise that Giguere, born and raised in Montreal, grew up idolizing Roy, who had entered the NHL when Giguere was just 8 years old.
NON-NHL CAREER
Post-Draft Teams: Granby (QMJHL); Sherbrooke (AHL)
Olympics: 1998 (fourth place)
NON-NHL AWARDS AND HONORS
AHL Calder Cup:
1985 (Sherbrooke)
Olympics Goalie Minutes Leader: 1998 (369 minutes)
AHL Playoffs GAA Leader: 1985 (Sherbrooke) (2.89)
AHL Playoffs Minutes Leader: 1985 (Sherbrooke) (769 minutes)
AHL Playoffs Wins Leader: 1985 (Sherbrooke) (10 wins)
Management Career: Invested in Quebec (QMJHL) expansion franchise in 1997 and remained a co-owner of team into 2004-05 season. ... Named Quebec (QMJHL) general manager in August 2003 and remained in that position into 2004-05 season..
Miscellaneous: Attended Team Canada training camp for 1987 Canada Cup, but was cut from roster prior to tournament. ... Was on Montreal team that joined Minnesota to compete in the 1990 NHL Friendship Tour in Soviet Union. ... Voted Denver's top athlete in 1997 poll of local sports fans. ... An avid collector of hockey cards, his collection was estimated to include 85,000 cards in 1998, and featured old hockey cards from as far back as 1911. ... An avid tennis player, he once played against Monica Seles. ... Very superstitious, Roy was known for refusing to skate on either the blue or red lines, wrote the names of his children on his stick before each game, and kept pucks from each shutout in his locker until the very end of the season, when he would take them home. ... Was active in charitable causes during his playing days, including work with Ronald McDonald House.
Personal: NIcknamed "St. Patrick." ... Older brother of ex-NHL player Stephane Roy. ... Father of Canadian junior player Jonathan Roy.
HOW HE GOT AWAY
TRADE: Montreal traded Roy and Mike Keane to Colorado in exchange for Andrei Kovalenko, Martin Rucinsky and Jocelyn Thibault on December 6, 1995.

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SNAPSHOT '84
Total Selected: 250
Forwards: 142
Defense: 88
Goaltenders: 20
Major Junior: 110
Tier II/Jr. B: 16/9
College Players: 23
High School: 47
Midget: 4
U.S. Junior B: 1
Canadian: 145
Euro-Canadian: 2
USA Citizens: 62
U.S.-Born: 63
European: 41
Reached NHL: 102
Stanley Cup: 20
Hall of Fame: 1
All-Star Game: 18
Year-end All-Star: 7
Olympians: 31
 
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